Goodbye 2016

    Posted on Tuesday, Jan 17, 2017
    Being home for the holidays can be a rollercoaster of emotions. For those of us lucky (or unlucky) enough to be close to family, the holidays means time to catch up and offers much needed sleep and stuffing our bellies. For others, like myself, who are not native to Texas, it could mean traveling, having many social obligations, and playing catch up on everything we’ve missed while away.

    Similar to the memes surrounding how tumultuous 2016 was, my life has been a rollercoaster this past year. New relationships, closing and opening bridges, going on new adventures, facing difficult (and I mean difficult) roadblocks, and trying to be a sane, healthy, and happy human being has been a challenge. Though, through all the hardships and prosperous moments we face, we are capable of learning, growing, and redeeming ourselves. This is what makes us human. The possibility for change and growth, despite being flawed human beings.

    History-Meme.png
    I hope anyone reading this blog can take a moment to be hopeful for 2017. I know it sounds clich̩, and may not be relevant to your life, but a moment in time does not have to define your life. Taking a moment, or several moments in my case, to reevaluate all that has happened in the past year could impact your upcoming year. Take a moment to determine what was great, and what was not so great Рand try to learn from that to improve your life. Below are some questions you can answer to help you self-reflect to end the year.
    Happy holidays from one of your graduate student bloggers,
    Adam
     
    Self-Reflection Questions (based from http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/eileenchadnick/reflect-on-new-year_b_8899132.html)
    • What went well?
    • Who needs to be acknowledged?
    • How did you grow this past year?
    • What were stand-out moments for you?
    • What is not working?
    • What are your upcoming goals? How will you achieve it?
    • Who do you want to be?

    Adam Orendain | Biomedical Engineering

    Adam Orendain is a doctoral student in Biomedical Engineering.


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